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July 30, 2010

3.010: storage savvy: blogging with cred

cropped-blog-header1[1] Just a quick note to give a shout-out to a relatively new EMC employee blogger, Richard Anderson. His personal, not-reviewed-or-approved-by-EMC blog is at storagesavvy.com.

Richard joined EMC earlier this year, coming from Nintendo where he managed both EMC and NetApp kit. His experience provides the credibility to support a rather broad swath of topics, and he has been providing practical comparisons of EMC and NTAP products long well before joining EMC.

As interesting as those comparisons are (and surely they will be fodder for more competitive battles royale), I found his two recent posts on VPLEX (here and there) provided some very grounded perspectives. I’m hopeful that he might soon undertake a comparative review of VPLEX Metro and it’s fault-tolerant Active/Active presentation of LUNs.

If you haven’t read Richards’s material, there is a lot of content. I found it laced with grounded perspective from a hands-on technical perspective – very refreshing, if I do say so myself.

Welcome to the party, Richard – looks like you’ll fit right in…


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Storagesavvy

Thank you for the kind words Barry. My blog topics have obviously shifted a bit since coming to work for EMC but I'm finding that for the most part, discussions I have with customers make for good blog topics.

Oh and the VPLEX Local discussion I had with that customer turned into a VPLEX Local and Metro Proof-of-Concept that we're ramping up soon. So I should have something to write on that in the next month or so.

Richard

Vaughn Stewart

Thank you for taking the time to share information with the community. there’s nothing like an open dialog.

I believe you have one error in your post. When you claim you can’t compare a unified array to a SAN. This is untrue, just compare the NetApp SAN to a Symmetrix or a Clariion. This allows cusomters to understand the differences in storage savings technologies.

I went into details here:

http://blogs.netapp.com/virtualstorageguy/2010/07/myth-busting-storage-guarantees—part-ii.html

Again, thanks for sharing. If you have any feedback, just ping me. I’m more than happy to advance my knowledge base.

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